Posted 30/10/2016

Paint Splatter: Orruk Brutes and Gore-gruntas

This Paint Splatter provides handy tips and a stage-by-stage painting guide for Orruk Brutes and Gore-gruntas in the colours of the Ironsunz, the flashiest of all Ironjawz warclans.

No two Ironjawz warclans wear the same colour armour. Otherwise, how would the enemy know who was killing them? Some of these colour schemes are born out of the orruks’ grim sense of humour; the Asheater Boyz, for example, paint their armour black using the ashes of their immolated foes. Most Ironjawz warclans, however, tend to paint their armour in the brightest colours possible, daubing them with flame motifs, checks and dags to make them look even more impressive. For an orruk, the brighter his armour, the more flashy he must surely be. Not all see it that way, but those differences of opinion are easily settled with violence. This issue, we focus on the Ironsunz, the flashiest and most brightly armoured of all the warclans. Yellow is often regarded as a tricky colour to paint on account of its low pigmentation making it difficult to paint over a Chaos Black undercoat. That’s why, for the orruks shown above, the Studio’s army painting team used a Corax White undercoat. Darker areas of the models, such as leather and the gruntas’ fur, may take a little longer to paint as you’ll have to establish a solid basecoat for each colour, but this minor inconvenience is far outweighed by how easy the yellow is to paint and how vibrant it will be when you’re done painting.

More expert advice

If you’re after more painting tips for your orruks, we highly recommend getting your boss klaws on a copy of How to Paint Citadel Miniatures: Ironjawz. Inside, you’ll find loads of handy painting advice for the Ironjawz, such as how to paint different coloured gruntas, a stage-by-stage guide for a red Maw-krusha (it flies faster than all the others) and useful tips on how to paint flame motifs, checks and dags.

Orruk Brutes

When learning to paint, some techniques are much easier to pick up than others. Drybrushing, for example, is a simple technique that’s much easier to pick up than layering, which is why we’ve included guides for both drybrushing and layering Orruk Brutes. If you’re pretty confident with a small brush, then take the plunge and start layering. If not, drybrushing gives equally good results, with the added advantage that you’ll see those results even quicker. You can see finished models using both techniques at the bottom of the article.

Gnarly Green Skin

gnarly-green-skin1 gnarly-green-skin2 gnarly-green-skin3a OR gnarly-green-skin3b

Ironsunz Armour

ironsunz-armour1 ironsunz-armour2 ironsunz-armour3a OR ironsunz-armour3b

Iron Choppas

iron-choppas1 iron-choppas2 iron-choppas3a-2 OR iron-choppas3b

Red Bitz

red-bitz1 red-bitz2

A top tip when painting your Orruk Brutes is to basecoat the yellow armour first. It is, after all, the largest part of the model. When you wash it with Seraphim Sepia, thin it down with Lahmian Medium and apply it into the recesses, that way the armour will retain its vibrant tone. When painting the skin, be careful not to get green on the armour as it will be hard to tidy up. If this does happen, a simple trick is to disguise that part of the model with a darker colour, such as a red dag or a bit of battle damage. The Brute below has a red kneepad for just that reason!

Wrappings & Teef

wrappings-teef1 wrappings-teef2 wrappings-teef3

Leather Trousers

leather-trousers1 leather-trousers2 leather-trousers3

Pig-skin Boots

pig-skin-boots1 pig-skin-boots2 pig-skin-boots3

Brass Bitz

brass-bitz1 brass-bitz2 brass-bitz3a OR brass-bitz3b

1: This Orruk Brute was painted using the drybrush finishing stages from the previous page. 2: …while this Brute was painted using the Layer stages. Both models look great, even though they were finished using two completely different techniques. This model also features battle damage on his armour, a last little touch that makes the orruk look as though he’s been in the thick of the fighting. To achieve this look, Rhinox Hide was applied to some of the edges and raised areas of the orruk’s armour panels. A tiny scratch of Runefang Steel was then applied inside the Rhinox Hide to give the impression of bare metal beneath the yellow paint.

1: This Orruk Brute was painted using the drybrush finishing stages from the previous page.
2: …while this Brute was painted using the Layer stages. Both models look great, even though they were finished using two completely different techniques. This model also features battle damage on his armour, a last little touch that makes the orruk look as though he’s been in the thick of the fighting. To achieve this look, Rhinox Hide was applied to some of the edges and raised areas of the orruk’s armour panels. A tiny scratch of Runefang Steel was then applied inside the Rhinox Hide to give the impression of bare metal beneath the yellow paint.

Orruk Gore-gruntas

When painting the Gore-gruntas, it’s worth undercoating them with Corax White, just like the Brutes, to make painting the yellow armour easier. The first stage of the model is to paint the fur, which makes up the bulk of the grunta. As long as you drybrush it neatly, you shouldn’t have much tidying up to do, but if you need to, you can re-undercoat areas to be painted yellow with a layer of Ceramite White. We suggest doing any tidying up last, there’s no point painting over a mistake, only to make another one a few minutes later.

Skin

skin1 skin2 skin3 skin4

Dirty Teef

dirty-teef1 dirty-teef2 dirty-teef3 dirty-teef4

Mangy Fur

mangy-fur1 mangy-fur2 mangy-fur3

Hooves

hooves1 hooves2 hooves3

Tongue

tongue1 tongue2

To paint the riders for your Gore-gruntas, use the guide for the Brutes on the left.

To paint the riders for your Gore-gruntas, use the guide for the Brutes on the left.

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