Posted 18/12/2017

Moonclan Grots Made Easy

It’s time to peer once more into the Mind of Mengel, as hobby supremo Tyler Mengel brings us another guide to easily painting your core models for a new army. This time around, he’s been at the fungus brew (well, it is nearly Christmas), and is looking at Moonclan Grots. Here’s Tyler to tell you more.


I’ve always liked the black cloaked, mushroom brewing, mischievous imps that are the Moonclan Grots, even back when they were still known as Night Goblins. At some point, I would love to put together a small force of them for Warhammer Age of Sigmar, especially since they seem fairly quick to paint, even though you’ll be painting a lot of them. With that in mind, I decided to take a crack at painting one of the diminutive greenskins up.

Step 1.

When I built my Moonclan Grot, I decided to add a few mushrooms to his base so I could include that distinctive red mushroom look they are known for. I got these bits from the Shattered Dominion Base Detail Kit. There aren’t a ton of them in there, but there are enough that you can scatter them around a few of your bases. Instead of priming my model black, which may seem the logical thing to do for a model that’s 90% black cloth, I instead primed it with the Mechanicus Standard Grey spray. This also makes it easier, later on, to paint some of the lighter colours, like his skin, since it’s on top of a more neutral colour.

Step 2.

All of the cloth areas were then given three washes of Nuln Oil to darken it down. Make sure you wait for each layer to dry before doing the next. Now you’ll see it’s pretty close to black but has some variation in it, with the raised areas already being a little bit brighter than the folds. This gives it a slightly softer look too, which is perfect for cloth.

Step 3.

This was then line highlighted with Dawnstone. Just pick out all of the edges and the folds, but keep your lines fairly thin.

Step 4.

I finished off the cloth with a final highlight of Ulthuan Grey just along the most prominent edges and folds. Make sure you keep this smaller than the previous highlight.

Step 1.

All of the grot’s skin was base coated with Elysian Green. This may take two thin coats (thanks, Duncan!).

Step 2.

I then washed all of this with Athonian Camoshade. On some of the larger, flatter areas, like his arm, I more carefully washed this into only the crevices to save me some time on the next step.

Step 3.

This was then tidied up with Elysian Green again, leaving the wash only in the recesses.

Step 4.

I finished it off with a crisp line highlight of Ogryn Camo.

Step 1.

The spear haft, shoes, and the little bag on his waist were all base coated with Rhinox Hide.

Step 2.

At this step, I might normally use Agrax Earthshade, but since the Rhinox Hide is already quite dark, I decided to wash all of those areas with Nuln Oil for stronger contrast.

Step 3.

These were finished with a final line highlight of Gorthor Brown.

Step 1.

The rope around the grot’s waist, as well as the rope around the spear and the stalks of the mushrooms, were base coated with Rakarth Flesh.

Step 2.

The ropes were then given an all over wash of Seraphim Sepia (be careful on his waist not to get any on the black cloth), while the mushroom stalks just got a selective wash around where they meet the base and their caps.

Step 3.

The ropes were finished off with a highlight of Screaming Skull, and I also picked out his teeth at this point.

Step 4.

The mushroom caps were base coated with Mephiston Red to get a nice bright red. I painted the eyes at the same time.

Step 5.

These were then given a wash of Agrax Earthshade to make them look a little dirtier and more organic with an uneven texture.

Step 6.

The caps were highlighted with Wazdakka Red, picking out the edges of the caps and a few select lines along the side leading to the top.

Step 7.

Lastly, I painted on the distinctive spots with Pallid Wych Flesh (this is a softer, and warmer colour than straight white), and I also did a few line highlights on the stalks at the same time.

Step 1.

The flat area of the shield was painted with Abaddon Black.

Step 2.

The spear tip and rim of the shield were base coated with Leadbelcher.

Step 3.

The silver areas were then washed with Agrax Earthshade to make them look dirty.

Step 4.

The moon on the shield was base coated with Balthasar Gold. I used this colour instead of yellow to give him a darker, more realistic look. I also figured grots wouldn’t have easy access to gold, so the Balthasar Gold looks a bit more like bronze.

Step 5.

The moon was washed with Agrax Earthshade.

Step 6.

All of the metallics were edge highlighted with Stormhost Silver and I painted a few small scratches on them at the same time. I also went back and got the chainmail between his legs since I realized I missed it in an earlier step.

With that final step, the model is all done! Base it to match the rest of your army, and he’s ready to raid, pillage, and cause general mischief. I based mine with a layer of the Astrogranite texture paint, dry brushed with Dawnstone, followed by Celestra Grey to get a cave floor look that was a lighter shade than his robes. You can, of course, simplify any of these steps as much as you want by leaving out a highlight or two, but with their small size, they really are fairly quick to paint.


Thanks to Tyler for another fantastic guide to easily making these grots look great. There’ll be more from the Mind of Mengel soon, but in the meantime, if you’ve tried out one of his guides, show us some pictures of the results on the Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer Age of Sigmar Facebook pages – we’d love to see them!

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