Posted 19/09/2017

Hexwraiths Made Easy

With new allegiance abilities in the General’s Handbook 2017, it’s a great time to start playing Nighthaunts, and our friend Tyler Mengel is on hand with an easy guide for getting striking results with minimal fuss when painting yours:


Tyler: When I started my Nighthaunts army I had one major goal in mind: I wanted them to be quick to paint and still look good on the table. Having seen a few people use the Nihilakh Oxide paint to good effect I decided to give it a spin. Whenever I compromise in one area of a paint job, in this case, using a Nihilakh Oxide wash over Corax White primer as my main colour, I try to compensate in another area. That meant absolutely no drybrushing, since I wanted to make all of my highlights as neat and crisp as possible. Luckily for me, this turned out to be a fantastically quick way to paint all things ghostly, and now on the tail end of my 2,000 point army (as of writing I am finishing up my last Mourngul) I can turn through this scheme fairly efficiently. Armed with only 15 different paints you too can tackle a Nighthaunts army with ease!

Step 1.

I primed the model with Corax White to act as my basecoat. If you need to do any touch up this colour is pretty close to Ulthuan Grey, although I wouldn’t worry too much if there is a bit of grey showing through in areas that would be in shadow. This will create a nice gradient and be mostly covered up by our next step anyway.

Step 2.

I then shaded the whole model with a 30/70 mix of Nihilakh Oxide and Lahmian Medium. You really want to make sure the Nihilakh Oxide is nice and diluted so that it doesn’t tint the model too dark. I generally do 3 parts of Lahmian Medium for every part of Nihilakh Oxide. Paint this over all of the areas that will be ghostly, which will pretty much be everything besides the scythes and chains. You’ll want to watch for it drying in weird pools in places so you can fix it before it’s completely dry. Also, watch out for stray hairs and particles that may sneak their way onto your brush – they’ll stand out against the near white of the model if they make it on there.

Step 3.

 

Next, I used Coelia Greenshade to darken down the recesses more. I mixed it with a little bit of Lahmian Medium as well and painted it on exactly where I wanted it. I also painted all of the flames with this at this step. You want to be extra careful during this step. If you need to fix any mistakes from steps 2 or 3, you can make a mix of Ulthuan Grey and Nihilakh Oxide and carefully tidy them up.

Step 4.

Finally, I highlighted the whole model with White Scar. Pick out all of the edges on armour, bones, and the folds in the cloth on the horses. I also picked out all of the flames.

Step 1.

Now we’re already about 70% done with the model. The next parts to tackle are the scythes. I basecoated the hafts on all of these with Abaddon Black. You want to be really careful since some of the Hexwraiths are holding these pretty close to their bodies. This method is all about being as neat as you can be with all of the steps after the ghostly parts since it’ll be pretty hard to fix any mistakes.

Step 2.

I then highlighted all of the wood grain with Dawnstone Grey. I looked for any raised areas on the haft and picked them out.

Step 3.

This was followed by a more refined highlight of Administratum Grey. I mostly followed the previous highlights but kept it thinner and more focused around pronounced edges and bumps.

Step 4.

Finally, on the haft, I wanted to tie it into the ghostly colour more. To do this I went over all of the highlights with Nihilakh Oxide. Since this is a translucent colour it just slightly tints the grey to be more of a green-blue. I also wanted to blend it in near where the hands are holding it. Mixing the Nihilakh Oxide with some Lahmian Medium I built up a few layers around the hands on the haft, making sure it got thinner and thinner the further away from the hands it got. I mixed in a bit of White Scar for right next to the hands and then painted a line of Coelia Greenshade where the hands meet the weapon to separate them visually again.

Step 1.

I basecoated all of the metal areas with Leadbelcher. This included the scythes, chains, and bowls at the ends of some of the chains.

Step 2.

This was then washed with Agrax Earthshade. Be particularly careful with this on the chains hanging from their waists so you don’t get any on the rest of the model.

Step 3.

I then highlighted all of this with Stormhost Silver. I also painted on a few scratches on the scythes and bowls. Just keep these small and reserved.

Step 4.

I wanted to dirty up the metals a bit and make them look aged, so I used some heavily watered down Skrag Brown and painted on random splotches. This is meant to look like rust. I focused it a little heavier around areas where two pieces of metal joined, but for the most part, just make it look random.

Step 5.

Finally, I did where the chains meet the bodies with the same ghostly effect that I used on the hafts. I just used a few layers of watered down Nihilakh Oxide to build up the transition and then finally used Nihilakh Oxide mixed with White Scar to highlight a few of the links near the top.

Step 1.

On any of the models that have skull braziers hanging off their chains, you may want to touch those up a bit with Ulthuan Grey if you got any other colours on them earlier. Once they are clean again wash all of them with Seraphim Sepia.

Step 2.

Once this is done, simply pick out some highlights with White Scar and then the bone is done.

Step 1.

I glazed all of the flames on the model with Waywatcher Green. I ended up doing around 2-3 coats of this to get a solid looking green colour.

Step 2.

I then glazed a little bit of Nuln Oil on the trailing ends of the flames to get a smokey look to them.

Step 3.

This was followed by going back in with White Scar at the origins of the flames to make them look brighter and hotter there. I watered this down a lot and made sure I got it between the flames a bit.

Step 4.

Lastly, I went back with Waywatcher Green and smoothed out some of the transitions between the white, green, and black.

Lastly, base the model to match the rest of your army and then you’re done! This is pretty much the exact same method I use on all of my Nighthaunts models, with a few variations here and there. Since 90% of the model is that ghostly white colour, once that’s done you’re in the home stretch. Hopefully, with this tutorial, you can get your own spectral host painted up in no time and start terrorising the Mortal Realms with them!


Want to try it for yourself? Get started with your Nighthaunts army here. New allegiance abilities for the Nighthaunts can be found in the General’s Handbook 2017.

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